• First, we’re having a GREAT time with the One School-One Book program…. Getting “thank you” notes from parents already about how it’s “forcing” some family reading time that they seemed to have lost over the years.
    — Paul Marinko - Principal at St. Paul's Lutheran School - Fort Wayne, IN
  • Since last spring, our entire school has excitedly embraced the One School, One Book Program. We will soon begin our spring selection: A Cricket in Times Square -- the third book we've adopted since the spring of 2010!

    We are so thrilled with the positive impact this program has had on our students, families, and staff
    — Laurie LaRue - First Grade Teacher at Edgewood School - Bristol, CT
  • I think the OSOB program is brilliant. My seven year-old attends Orleans Elementary in Massachusetts and they (we) are reading Masterpiece. Since the grades levels range from one to five at this school, finding a book to suit all is difficult. My daughter can follow the big picture somewhat but we have to reinforce what we’ve read because it’s a lot to take in for her.
    — Glenn Krzeminski - Parent of student at Orleans Elementary - Orleans, MA
  • The One District, One Book program promoted by Read To Them...is a powerful way to systemically address and promote a culture of literacy throughout the entire school system.

    My school actually adopted a hamster and even used it as “pet therapy” for many of the behaviorally challenged children in our school.
    — Kenny Moles of West Virginia

Dominic

by William Steig (1972)

William Steig was an acclaimed cartoonist and children’s author. His work includes the Caldecott winner, Sylvester and the Magic Pebble, and even the original Shrek. Famous for his winsome line drawings and his vocabulary rich prose, he wrote only one full fledged novel for children – Dominic.

Dominic is an ideal book for families first making the transition from picture books to chapter books. Each chapter contains plenty of action – and two to three Steig pictures, too. The action is quick and plentiful. And yet Dominic is not a comic book. His adventures are also full of occasional moments of quiet reflection or piccolo playing.

Finally, Steig’s aggressive, playful, imaginative use of vocabulary enriches the prose. Check out the “Dominic Vocabulary List” which contains words worthy of the SAT, and yet the prose can easily be followed and understood and treasured by a first grader. That’s the magic of reading aloud, courtesy of William Steig.


There are ten supplementary resources for William Steig’s Dominic:

  • a sample letter home to parents
  • a sample reading schedule
  • a sample assembly script
  • Daily Trivia Questions (w/ Answer Key)
  • a Trivia Contest (w/ Answer Key)
  • a list of suggested activities
  • a Dominic Vocabulary contest list
  • a sample audio file

As a participating member of One School, One Book you may have access to all of these documents. Here are some samples:

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