• First, we’re having a GREAT time with the One School-One Book program…. Getting “thank you” notes from parents already about how it’s “forcing” some family reading time that they seemed to have lost over the years.
    — Paul Marinko - Principal at St. Paul's Lutheran School - Fort Wayne, IN
  • Since last spring, our entire school has excitedly embraced the One School, One Book Program. We will soon begin our spring selection: A Cricket in Times Square -- the third book we've adopted since the spring of 2010!

    We are so thrilled with the positive impact this program has had on our students, families, and staff
    — Laurie LaRue - First Grade Teacher at Edgewood School - Bristol, CT
  • I think the OSOB program is brilliant. My seven year-old attends Orleans Elementary in Massachusetts and they (we) are reading Masterpiece. Since the grades levels range from one to five at this school, finding a book to suit all is difficult. My daughter can follow the big picture somewhat but we have to reinforce what we’ve read because it’s a lot to take in for her.
    — Glenn Krzeminski - Parent of student at Orleans Elementary - Orleans, MA
  • The One District, One Book program promoted by Read To Them...is a powerful way to systemically address and promote a culture of literacy throughout the entire school system.

    My school actually adopted a hamster and even used it as “pet therapy” for many of the behaviorally challenged children in our school.
    — Kenny Moles of West Virginia

Featured District

2014 Model District: Carroll ISD – Southlake, TX

Margo Rudder knows how to take a good idea – and make it better.  She first brought One School, One Book to her school – Johnson E.S., in Southlake, Texas – in 2013.  They read the perennial classic, E.B. White’s Charlotte’s Web.  Her principal, Lori Allison, thought the experience was so rewarding for Johnson families, she couldn’t wait to read a second book.

But that wasn’t enough.  If OSOB was good for Johnson families, and if two books are better than one – why not take the idea and spread it to her entire district – to expand that community of readers?  And that’s just what she did.  She pitched to her fellow librarians across the Carroll Independent School District.  She told them how easy it was to implement ODOB – and how fun – and how exciting and motivating it would be for their families.  Her fellow librarians were sold – and in turn sold their principals.  And One District, One Book came to Southlake.

Five schools – over 1500 families – read Betty G. Birney’s World According to Humphrey in the fall of 2013.  Their efforts were catalogued in the local press and they created a local TV advertisement to play in district schools promoting Humphrey and ODOB.

But that still wasn’t enough.  Southlake’s families responded so well to Humphrey – they came back for a twofer.  They chose to read a second book in the spring – Beverly Cleary’s The Mouse and the Motorcycle.  Across Carroll ISD families supported the initiative, acquiring their own copies of their ODOB titles.

That’s how to expand the reach of family literacy.  That’s how you create a culture of literacy in every home.  That’s how you build and grow a community of readers.

Congratulations Southlake and Carroll ISD.  Congratulations, Margo.  You’re our 2014 ODOB District of the year!

 

2013 Model District: Currituck County, N.C.

It takes two kinds of people to help spread OSOB from one school to an entire district – two kinds to make ODOB happen. Currituck County, North Carolina has both of them.

It started with Steve Blackstock – the Matador. Steve is the principal at Jarvisburg E.S. He brought One School, One Book to Jarvisburg. They read Beverly Cleary’s The Mouse and the Motorcycle. His families loved the experience and Steve realized he had something special – something that couldn’t just stay at his school. He took the next step – he made the special effort – the crucial link enabling OSOB to become One District, One Book in Currituck.

He went beyond. He took OSOB to his sister schools in Currituck County. He took it to the School Board. He took it to his Superintendent. And they said Yes – the second crucial step in the establishment of ODOB – the district-wide book club. [“When a whole district reads a book, there’s a whole lot to talk about.”]

Everyone said Yes – and Currituck was on its way. They too read Beverly Cleary’s The Mouse and the Motorcycle and shared an amazing experience – one that is still providing rewards for Currituck’s families – and details for Read to Them.

Currituck created their community of readers by including the entire community – including the now proverbial custodians and cafeteria staff and bus drivers. (One bus driver so enjoyed the experience, that when he missed a day he made sure his substitute was up to speed on Mr. Popper’s Penguins so he could trade trivia w/ the kids those days.) Currituck expanded its notion of a community read – including even one family so dedicated – or who valued the family time so much – they did there reading together during visiting hours in prison! (That ought to make each of us appreciate our humdrum opportunities to read together as a family.)

Currituck’s effort was so successful that their School Board devoted an entire meeting to celebrating their efforts and learning more about what they did and how they accomplished it. Students, parents, teachers, administrators, and school board members all spoke at the meeting. (Sandy Kinzel, the Title I co-ordinator, said One District, One Book is the most effective program she has come across – in 20 years – at promoting parental involvement.)

 

School Board Video

board-meeting
Listen in as the Currituck County School Board discusses their district’s experience reading The Mouse and the Motorcycle. Click here for the full video!

 

2012 Model District: Sauk Rapids-Rice

In 2009-2010 Read to Them expanded it’s One School, One Book program to encompass school districts – families from an entire district of schools all reading the same book at the same time – at home. One District, One Book began that year in Hampton, Virginia and Bentonville, Arkansas and has built up steam slowly.

In 2011-2012 twelve new districts – encompassing 48 school – joined the program – spreading a culture of literacy and creating a community of readers in families and communities from Maryland and Massachusetts and New Jersey all the way to Idaho.

One District, One Book has now reached the critical mass that allows Read to Them to now name the first ever One District, One Book Model District of the Year (for 2012). That district is Sauk Rapids-Rice, Minnesota – a district of four schools that this year read George Selden’s A Cricket in Times Square.

Sauk Rapids-Rice’s efforts was spearheaded Lori Posch, the Integration Liaison for SRR’s elementary and middle schools. Lori and her committee documented their efforts spectacularly. Among the photos shared from Sauk Rapids-Rice are images of the SRR school board all investigating and reading A Cricket in Times Square (to learn about and greenlight the program) – and photos too of the SRR Rotary Club – also reading the book – to better understand why they were asked to help fund the program for Sauk Rapids-Rice.

Sauk Rapids-Rice followed the example of previous pioneers – setting up a faux Grand Central subway station newsstand in their library; creating a web-page of links and relevant images and videos (including personal post-cards); creating a rich trove of photographs and sharing and posting them in an impressive and robust series of slideshows; creating, sharing, and posting individual mp3 files of each chapter read by district teachers and administrators.

They also held one of the most impressive Family Reading Nights we have witnessed this decade. Hosting a reading night for an entire district is an awesome affair – and the pictures show it. Sauk Rapids-Rice created numerous engage-the-book activities that helped bring younger readers into the world of Chester Cricket. They even enlisted support from varsity football player – showing us all how inclusive and expansive the Community of Readers can be.

For showing all how fun and rewarding reading one book as an entire district can be; for daring to do so across an entire district; for documenting and sharing their efforts so well and so usefully; and for innovating and executing with such passion and panache – Sauk Rapids-Rice is Read to Them’s ODOB 2012 District of the Year. Congratulations to all in their community – from school board and Rotary Club members, to parents and teachers, to Lori Posch and those varsity football players. Read to Them looks forward to what Sauk Rapids-Rice might achieve in 2013 – and invites districts across the country to create a Community of Readers in your district, too.

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